Facts & Info

6 Classic Kinky Books to Turn You On

Woman Reading in Bed

Looking for a kinky partner, but not having much luck? Erotic books are an excellent way to satisfy your fantasies and fetishes when you are flying solo.

6 Kinky Books to Give You a Thrill

1. by E. L. James

The Fifty Shades of Grey book franchise and all its spinoffs shows no signs of slowing down. The E.L. James BDSM romance novel has sold over 125 million copies.

The story of Anastasia falling in love with business magnate Christian Grey and becoming his submissive is notoriously sappy and badly written, with wooden characterizations and corny sex scenes. But as a phenomenon, it revealed that it’s not just men who are kinky at heart.

Women can’t get enough of serving Christian Grey.

2. by Judy Blume

While most books are way racier today, Judy Blume was always a pioneer, and she treated sex subjects with frankness and humanity, whether it was teenage boy masturbation, coping with disability, losing a parent, menstruating, or betrayals in friendship and love. Her books aren’t high literature, but their emotional honesty and willingness to allow characters genuine complexity makes them classics nonetheless.

Wifey isn’t particularly kinky in terms of fetishes or BDSM, but it openly explores a woman’s sexual fantasy and inner sexual world, portraying a bored housewife who felt her identity had been lost. To find herself, she embarks on a voyage of sexual awakening that starts in her mind and ends in an affair. It’s a page turning saga that starts off with a rogue motorcyclist fondling himself in front of her. The book’s strength is how realistic it is.

3. by Pauline Reage

Forty years before Fifty Shades’ tepid BDSM, there was this sensational shocker, where a female submissive, known as O (for Odile, her name, or for object, or for orifice) is trained to offer ready and willing orifice service—oral, vagina, and anal.

This book was hardcore and complex. It was long assumed to be written by a man, but behind the pseudonym was a woman with another pseudonym, and then another, who confessed the fantasies of humiliation, subservience, castles, sex societies, lashings, piercings, and scars were her own.

4. by A. N. Roquelaure

Anne Rice’s trilogy was as imaginative and beautifully written as her vampire and historical sagas. Their hardcore kink content helped mainstream BDSM as Goth and other subcultures devoted to her literature flocked to kinky fetish parties in nightclubs, toting the Beauty books everywhere they went.

When Sleeping Beauty wakes up from the hundred-year spell, she enters into a sexual initiation. Lots and lots of spanking.

5. by J.G. Ballard

The mainstream population can be forgiven for not knowing anything about symphorophilia until the movie adaptation of Ballard’s Crash was an unexpected cinema hit. Crash double tackles the somewhat obscure fetish of being in a car accident and the psychology of modern victimology, where folks find purpose in extreme celebrity drama or news gore.

It’s a great book, but as far as freaky fetish stuff goes, it’s openly judgemental, assuming kinksters of this ilk are perverts and their purpose is the same as those who revel in extreme “car crash” type talk shows. Ballard was always openly about his writing aims: “I wanted to rub the human face in its own vomit.”

In other words, the book is a far cry from being the perverted advocacy of an extreme kink, which some feel was the movie’s goal. Ballard won’t affirm your fetishes, but if you enjoy nihilist dystopian fiction, it’s a great book.

6. by Mary Gaitskill

These are smart short stories, with a deftly talented pen as whip. They are sexy stories with lots of kink, but their purpose isn’t erotic titillation, it is the literary exploration of diverse human behavior and sexuality. The collection has become a cult classic and launched a successful writing career for its author.

Tell us what you think!

Tell us what you think!

To Top

Online porn video at mobile phone